g&l asat, fuzzed and looped

Recorded another bit of improvising yesterday, this time with my G&L ASAT, which is Leo Fender’s post-Fender Telecaster. The signal path here is guitar > Shoctopus (custom octave-down fuzz) > Strymon Timeline > Strymon BlueSky reverb > Vox Night Train amp. The first section relies on the Timeline’s Lofi mode to get that honky grind, and the second section uses the Shoctapus.

I’ve reached the point now on the guitar where that what I can hear in my head and I want to do is just out of my reach to make it frustrating. When I started playing nineteen months ago, I might listen to something I like, or have a tune or sound in my head, and it may have well have been made my martians cause I had no idea what they were doing or how to get to that sound. However now I can hear this stuff in my ears or head and it often seems right there, but my technical abilities aren’t there. In many cases, not even close. It’s both frustrating and inspiring at the same time…

jazzmaster, delayed and crinkled

I’ve been listening to a lot of stuff from the Soundcloud feed of Kirk Markarian, known as Deuterostome. He records using various tape recorders and is perfectly happy to make use of the imperfections in the tape speed and saturation.

I spent a few hours with my blue CiJ Jazzmaster on Friday night, late after everyone here had gone to bed. I decided to see what I could do with my Strymon Timeline in dTape mode and the vibrato setting on my Clone Theory chorus pedal. The complete chain is guitar > Clone Theory > Timeline > BlueSky > Boss RC-3 > Night Train. This 8:49 here is edited down from about a half hour of recording using a Zoom H4N sitting next to my Vox Night Train head and Egnater cabinet.

The Clone Theory is a hell of a noisy pedal, and this is exacerbated by the delay and reverb. I suppose, it actually adds to the effect I was looking for in this case, but I’m still pretty certain that it’s going to get replaced this week by, hm, maybe a Strymom Ola?
I’d also like to see how to push this further, this sound. The Strymon ElCapistan does a nice job, but with the Timeline it’s hard to justify that. My favorite guitar shop down the street is expecting to get the ZVex Instant Low-Fi Junkie soon. Or maybe I’ll just do it right and find my old tape recorder down in the basement…

curly noodles


The music room in my house is currently in flux. I’ve realized that I have an ongoing frustration with the fact that when I want to do something more than merely play the guitar through the amp or poke around on the modular synth, it usually takes as long to set up the audio path as I actually have time in the studio. So I’m unplugging cables, replugging cables, setting up series of stompboxes, unraveling wires, and so on. And I’m sure that it’s related that when I get all this ready to go and sit down with the headphones on it takes another ten minutes to figure out why I’m not hearing anything (it’s usually because the audio in the MOTU Ultralite is being routed to the main outs rather than the headphone outs, or else the channel I’m using is muted).
So in hopes of fixing this and making it all a bit more fun and efficient, I’ve spent some time this last few weeks learning about things like mixers and patchbays. I recently ordered, and received this afternoon, a Mackie 1220i mixer, and an acquaintance gave me a 48-point patchbay as well as a wad of patch cables. I’ve diagrammed it all out and when I imagine being able to plug in anything to anything and inserting effects into any path, the possibilities really start getting interesting. Due to real life issues and deadlines, I’ll not get to test this theory and put it all together for about a month. But I’ll document this work and write a post or two about the process and results.
On a related note, while looking for mixers and patchbays I came across a used Zoom H4n digital recorder. This is a giant leap of an upgrade from the M-Audio Microtrack I currently use for recording duties. This beast deserves its own post, which I’ll get to at some point. The night before it arrived, however, I decided to bid good riddance to the Microtrack (it’s for sale if anyone is interested) and record some playing around with the guitar and some pedals through my Vox Night Train amp. The path here is G&L ASAT Classic -> MXR Tremolo -> Teese RMC3fl Wah pedal -> Strymon Timeline -> Strymon Blue Sky -> amp. The Multitrack sits in front of the cabinet (a 1×12 Egnater) and as you can tell picks up every bit of hum my system creates.

I’m just noodling here and mainly playing with the reverse mode and looping on the Timeline.

glass half empty, glass half full

music room tools

This is a process post about the third Disquiet Junto project, called “The Extended Glass Harp.” For this project, Marc wrote the following:

This project is in honor of Benjamin Franklin, after whose Junto Society our little group was named.

In an effort to expand and refine the glass harp, Franklin developed his own lathe-like glass harmonica, which he called the “armonica.” Marie Antoinette took lessons on it and Beethoven composed for it, but Franklin’s invention proved expensive and fragile, and it had a limited lifetime. And it may have given its frequent users lead poisoning.

You are *not* being asked to build a Franklin armonica. But like Franklin, we are going to expand on the glass harp. In our case, we are going to do so digitally.

You’re being asked to use the more common instrument, the glass harp. That involves the familiar “rubbing the top of a wine glass that has water in it” approach:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glass_harp

The Junto assignment is to record a live performance on the glass harp, and to employ live processing in the performance. There should be no post-production. And there is no length limit for the piece, though I would suggest that anything over 15 minutes may limit the size of your potential audience.

I’ve never recorded anything live, per se, in my music room before. I use my microphones to record sounds, of course, which then get processed and played at times. But the idea of no post-processing immediately created a bit of anxiety. This project was posted on Thursday evening last week, and I took the weekend to consider what I might do and how I might do it, and run my head through various audio chains. One limitation I knew I wanted was to keep the entire project limited to hardware tools I have. That is, effects pedals, the modular synth, and my (brand new!) OP-1 synth (of which I’ll post more about at a later date). The first two Junto projects were done almost entirely in the box. That is, with software, and I wanted to stay away from that for this assignment.

music room tools

I thought first about what I have that could record samples and, especially, loops. That would be my modified EHX Stereo Memory Man, My Boss RC-3 looper, the Tyme Sefari on the modular, and, after playing with it all weekend and being more than a little surprised at the capabilities of this thing, the OP-1. I decided that I’d take an hour or two on Monday, set everything up and cable it together, and press ‘record.’ I rehearsed a bit, recording the glass into the Tyme Sefari, testing the switches on the Stereo Memory Man, checking for feedback with the microphone (I ended up using headphones; if anyone knows some ways to record live without feedback problems, leave a comment!). I’d like to say when I was ready, I started recording, but part of this project was that, never having done anything like this, I knew “ready” was relative. There was no audience, unless you count my fiancĂ©e and our dog in the bedroom next door. Nevertheless, I was nervous. I had some idea of what was going to happen, but I also knew that I’d literally play it by ear, and make a lot of decisions on the fly. That’s one thing about these Junto projects, and this one in particular. I know my gear fairly well, especially the hardware (software is infinitely more complex and what with menus and MIDI, is often a mystery to me). But recording live like this really brings out the strengths and weaknesses, and uncovers possibilities that one might not have considered previously.

music room tools

What you hear here, then, is as follows. The microphone was connected to a mixer, with the Stereo Memory Man on an FX send channel. After beginning to record with Wave Editor on the laptop, I began by making the initial sound by rubbing the lip of the wine glass as I quietly switched on the looper of the Stereo Memory Man. The SMM records 30-seconds of audio, but I just took about five or six seconds, as it’s hard to play a wine glass with one hand while switching on a looper with another. You can hear the click of the looper switch on the audio, and then the loop begins. After a few seconds of this, I then played the second wine glass which had a higher pitch. This overdubs the first sound, so you can hear the changes on the loop (0:38).
At this point, I began sampling that loop to the Tyme Sefari on the modular synth. I had a button on a joystick module set up to start the recording with a gate signal. Concurrently, a four-step sequencer was affecting the sample-rate of the Tyme Sefari, which changed the effective pitch of the sample, and then also changed that pitch as it is played back. This creates a random-sounding sequence of bloops and digital whirrs, which you can hear beginning at 1:15. The Tyme Sefari playes back this sequence for some time, through the Pittsburgh Analog Delay module, and then through a Strymon BlueSky reverb before going into the audio interface and to Wave Editor. With slight changes to the delay times and the sample-rate of the playback, small changes are introduced to the sounds for the next several minutes.
As this played back, I removed the Stereo Memory Man from the chain and replaced it with the Teenage Engineering OP-1 synth. This thing is, again, brand new to me and I wasn’t at all sure that it would be appropriate for this project. As I spent time with it over the weekend, however, I realized that live sampling into its synth engine would work well, and if the line-in was active, it would pass the audio through to its outputs as well. The sampled audio could then be “played” via the keybaord or, more appropriate for these purposes, one of its four sequencers. It’s Pattern Sequencer was going to work best here, since it would create a very regular sequence that would repeat, and to which I could add notes as it repeated. It’s output was muted as I recorded the playing of the glass again (that makes three different pitches total). It needs six seconds to fill its sample memory, and as soon as it was done I began the sequence. Initially with just one note playing on the first downbeat, the volume was turned up as it went through the Tyme Sefari (but not sampled by the TS, merely passed along the dry channel). I cross-faded the random sequence from the TS with this regular sequence using the wet/dry mix on the Tyme Sefari to the point that all you hear for the last four or so minutes is the OP-1 sequence.
At around 9:45 I began removing notes from the sequence up to the point that it was done at 11:01. It’s funny, as I thought I’d recorded maybe six or seven minutes of audio, tops. I was pretty surprised when I saw it was 11:01. It’s easy to get carried away when things are going well.

Here’s the audio.

As I said earlier, these projects are leading to new workflows and results that I would not have otherwise come across. I like the results of all three so far, and I think they’re quite a departure from most of the sounds I make and post. Looking forward to number four.
Check out the entire Disquiet Junto group on SoundCloud. There is a lot of really interesting work there.
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